Animal testing



animal testing image1.2 million EU citizens have signed a petition for the complete ban of animal testing. Their argument being it is both unethical and not useful. In this activity students are asked to decide whether they agree. They apply their knowledge about how asthma affects the gas exchange system to examine evidence and decide if animal testing is essential to developing new asthma drugs. They also learn about how to use ethical thinking to make difficult decisions and study different ethical viewpoints.

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Science objective

Breathing: show how asthma affects the structure of the gas exchange system (KS3 Science Syllabus)

Designed for the KS3 Science SyllabusEnquiry objective

Examine consequences:  Select the choice which maximises the benefits and minimises the harm. List relevant ‘we should, or should not’ rules that everyone should follow (KS3 Science Syllabus)

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Animal testing - Lesson 1

Size: 6.29 MB

Animal testing - Lesson 2

Size: 9.20 MB

Animal testing (Teachers guide)

Size: 50.68 KB

Running the activity

Lesson 1

Engage Get students interested in the issue of animal testing
Review Students review their understanding of the gas exchange system
Consider Groups use evidence to discuss how essential animal testing is in drug development

Lesson 2

Engage Review the dilemma about signing the petition to ban animal testing
Play Students play a game to learn about how to use the three kinds of ethical thinking
Decide Groups use ethical thinking to write arguments for a class debate

For detailed running notes, download the teachers guide.

Weblinks

The European’s commission’s response

Their response to the petition (the ‘Stop Vivisection’ European Citizens’ Initiative)

Stop Vivisection

Arguments against the use of animal testing

Understanding animal research

Arguments for the use of animal testing

Animal testing in asthma research

This article outlines research that may lead to a new asthma drug which was developed using animal testing

Understanding asthma

A short video clip about the experience of having asthma and how animal research has contributed to treating asthma.

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6 Comments

  • judepeel says:

    Good debates

    My students struggled with the idea of whether a fact supported the need for animal testing or not. They are a very weak group though. The factsheet was a little much for them as well. Aside from these small niggles an interesting and useful resource

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  • bob says:

    andre

    Worked beautifully with a few adjustments

    The students were extremely well engaged and responded very well to all the activities. Since I used this with a year 8 class I found that they did not engage very well with the asthma information sheet. I found a great video explaining the symptoms of the disease instead. I also avoided playing the game and got the students discussing examples of each type of ethical thinking instead. I chose some students to give examples of the same and asked the rest of the class whether they would react in a similar way. This brought up a very lively discussion. I used the viewpoints sheet as a scaffold for lower ability writers and constructed a writing frame for an essay as the main assessment piece from the lesson.

    1
  • ujay says:

    Worked beautifully with a few adjustments

    The students were extremely well engaged and responded very well to all the activities. Since I used this with a year 8 class I found that they did not engage very well with the asthma information sheet. I found a great video explaining the symptoms of the disease instead. I also avoided playing the game and got the students discussing examples of each type of ethical thinking instead. I chose some students to give examples of the same and asked the rest of the class whether they would react in a similar way. This brought up a very lively discussion. I used the viewpoints sheet as a scaffold for lower ability writers and constructed a writing frame for an essay as the main assessment piece from the lesson.

    0
  • dclay says:

    SUPER

    Very engaging issues lesson

    1
  • Angharad07 says:

    Angharad07

    Before becoming a teacher, I worked in biomedical research at my local medical university. I worked on Salmonella typhi or Typhoid Fever. I worked in a mouse model. The typhoid bacillus is very cleaver and has lived with humans for 10 of thousands of years. The extent typhoid can evade the immune system is amazing. I saw typhoid bacillus living and reproducing inside a lymphocyte vacuole, innocuous to the chemicals being produced inside the vacuole. Using a mouse model to study the extent and progression of the invasion of the bacteria is absolutely necessary, unless you know some humans willing to ingest typhoid for testing! We were working on a new vaccine. I support this kind of animal testing 100%,

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